Build Grassfed Whey Protein
Find out how much protein you should be consuming a day!

PROTEIN CALCULATOR

How much protein do I need per day? A common question, with a lot of confusion.

In simple terms, optimal protein intake all depends on your individual needs, which is why we created this free protein calculator to help you navigate your protein questions and optimize your protein intake to reach your goals.

HOW TO USE THE PROTEIN CALCULATOR

Take the quiz
and we'll do the heavy lifting.

When inputting your personal information, be exact and honest with your current body weight, activity levels, and personal goals.

The more exact you are, the better-recommended protein intake we'll be able to give you.

After entering your details, our protein calculator will give you a better understanding of your protein needs.

HOW MUCH PROTEIN DO I NEED?

There's no cookie-cutter answer, an individual's protein needs depend on these factors;

  • Body Weight

  • Activity Level

  • Training Goals

For example...

A 200lb male with an intense training schedule who is looking to build muscle will need 200 grams of daily protein to meet his goals.

On the contrary, a 200 lb male with a low-level training schedule who is looking to lose fat while maintaining muscle will only need 127 grams of daily protein to meet his goals.

Take the quiz
to find out if you're hitting your daily protein needs.

THE IMPORTANCE OF PROTEIN

Protein is a macronutrient that your body needs in large amounts in order to maintain its structures and systems to function at optimal levels.

Protein is necessary for:

  • Tissue Growth

  • Energy Production

  • Hormone Regulation

  • Muscle Contraction

  • Carrying and Delivering Oxygen Molecules

As an athlete, protein helps to repair and strengthen muscle tissue, preserve lean body mass, promote muscle growth, and improve muscle recovery after training.

Without adequate amounts of daily protein, you may be subject to brittle hair, skin, and nails, muscle loss, decreased immunity, and fatigue.

No matter your stance on animal or plant-based diets, protein is essential to your bodily functions and you must ingest them in adequate amounts.

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CONSUME PROTEIN?

You should be consuming high-quality protein at every meal.

Structure your meals around protein to make sure you are hitting your macronutrient goals.

Remember this, your body needs protein to function and maintain its systems, without protein your body will be unbalanced and begin to lose muscle mass and strength, your metabolism will slow, and your cells will be starved of oxygen causing fatigue.

Use protein supplements to supplement the protein foods found in your diet or as a convenient way to get enough protein whenever you're on the go.

HIGH PROTEIN FOOD SOURCES

The best sources of protein come from whole food sources; such as meats, dairy products, eggs, etc.

High-quality protein powders can be used to supplement the gaps in your diet, however, you should structure your meals around whole food sources.

ANIMAL PROTEINS

  • Red Meat

  • Chicken

  • Fish

  • Eggs

  • Dairy Products

  • Whey Protein Powder

PLANT PROTEINS

  • Beans: White, Kidney, Lima, Black, and Chickpeas

  • Seeds: Hemp, Pumpkin, Flax, Chia, Sunflower, and Sesame

  • Lentils: Brown, Green, Black, and Red

  • Vegetables: Peas, Spinach,

  • Nuts: Peanuts, Almonds, Cashews, and Walnuts

WAYS TO INCREASE PROTEIN INTAKE

There are many ways that you can increase your protein intake, the key is to prioritize it.

Use these tips to hit your optimal daily protein intake;

  1. Eat high protein foods.

  2. Structure your meals around protein sources.

  3. Choose protein-rich snacks.

  4. Utilize ATH protein powders to increase your ensure you are getting enough protein daily.

ATH BUILD has 20-21 grams of protein per serving.

ATH Plant Protein has 20 grams of protein per serving.

HOW TO CHOOSE PROTEIN POWDER

There are different factors to consider when choosing a protein supplement.

  • Type of Protein

  • Goals

  • Ingredients

Before choosing a protein powder, take a look at the ingredient list and make sure that the source of protein powder matches your lifestyle by taking into consideration food allergies, animal-based powders, and plant-based supplements.

ANIMAL-BASED PROTEIN POWDERS

BUILD uses high-quality, non-GMO, grass-fed whey protein and has a full amino acid profile to fuel muscle growth, increase lean muscle mass, shorten recovery time, and increase lean protein intake.

Protein from grass-fed cows have a greater nutritional value and higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids, CLA (an omega-6 fatty acid), and vitamins A, D, and E compared to conventional protein powders.

BUILD consists of both isolate and concentrate versions sourced from dairy cows that have a 100% grass-fed non-GMO diet, with zero added rBGH or rBST hormones.

PLANT-BASED PROTEIN POWDERS

Plant-based protein powders offer a great alternative to individuals who follow a plant-based diet, have lactose intolerances, or are simply trying to reduce their intake of animal-based products.

ATHs Plant Protein uses the best sources of plant proteins, pea and brown rice, to pack in 20g of protein in each serving.

Aside from protein, our formula also uses Jerusalem Artichoke, Maca, Chia and Flax Seeds, and an antioxidant blend to provide probiotics, vitamins, and minerals to support micronutrient needs.

Simple, effective, and quality tested, plant protein can be used to gain muscle mass, decrease fat mass, shorten recovery time, and increase lean protein intake.

HOW MANY PROTEIN SHAKES A DAY?

The brunt of your protein should be coming from whole food sources, however, you can use supplements to increase your daily protein intake or as a convenient protein source when you're on the go.

Supplement your diet with 1-3 scoops of protein per day to hit your recommended amount.

PROTEIN SHAKES TO GAIN MUSCLE MASS

In order to gain muscle, you'll need added carbs and calories.

Try this recipe:

  • 12-14oz. nut milk of choice

  • 1-2 scoops of BUILD or Plant Protein

  • 1 banana

  • 1/2 cup rolled oats

  • 2 tablespoons peanut butter

PROTEIN SHAKES TO LOSE FAT MASS

Add protein to your favorite smoothies as a meal replacement. Added fruits and vegetables provide micronutrients to support your immune and digestive systems.

Try this recipe:

  • 12-14oz. ice-cold water

  • 1 scoop BUILD or Plant Protein

  • 1/2 banana

  • 1/2 cup frozen fruit

  • 1/2 cup fresh spinach

WHEN SHOULD YOU DRINK A PROTEIN SHAKE?

Whether you're trying to lose body fat, build muscle, or do both, protein shakes can be a convenient way to add more protein to your diet.

Protein shakes can be used as a:

  • Meal Replacement

  • High Protein Snack

  • Post Workout Shake

The timing of your protein shake will depend on your goals.

Individuals wanting to lose weight can use protein shakes as a meal replacement or high protein snack throughout the day. The added protein will help to curb cravings and keep you satiated.

Individuals using protein shakes for muscle gain can also incorporate them as high-protein snacks throughout the day, but more importantly, should prioritize their protein shakes after a workout to support their muscles.

No matter your goals, protein plays a critical role in you reaching them.

Take the quiz
and find out if you're consuming enough protein on a daily basis.

Find out how much protein you should be consuming a day!
  • 1. weight & routine
  • 2. goals
  • 3. dietary restrictions
  • 4. results

DIETARY RESTRICTIONS

Please check off any dietary restrictions that apply to you

No Dietary Restrictions

Plant-Based

Dairy Free

Gluten Free

Soy Free

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Results

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PROTEIN

0

GRAMS DAILY*

Here is the recommended amount of protein (listed in grams) you should be consuming per day. Meeting this amount of protein per day can be accomplished through a combination of meals and ATH Protein.

How Frequently Should I Take Protein?

Timing and spacing of protein servings matter as your body cannot “store” protein for future use (*6).

Here’s a good framework for how to think about achieving your target number each day:

Consume Protein Anytime
One Scoop

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

  • Protein quality matters. These results are based on consuming high-quality protein sources like ATH protein. If you are consuming lower-quality proteins as your primary sources, then you’ll need to increase your daily target number (*2).
  • Gender. There is no scientific data to suggest men and women differ substantially in their protein needs, other than body weight (*1).
  • Maximum daily amount. Current science suggests the recommended daily protein is approximately 1 gram per 1 lb of body weight, assuming this daily amount is timed and spaced appropriately throughout the day.

Sources for all data

(1) Morton, Robert W., Chris McGlory, and Stuart M. Phillips - "Nutritional interventions to augment resistance training-induced skeletal muscle hypertrophy" Copyright © 2015 Morton, McGlory and Phillips. Front Physiol 2015; 6: 245. Published online 2015 Sep 3. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2015.00245

(2) Phillips, Stuart M. - "The impact of protein quality on the promotion of resistance exercise-induced changes in muscle mass" Nutrition & Metabolism 2016 13:64 DOI: 10.1186/s12986-016-0124-8

(3) Thomas M. Doering, Peter R. Reaburn, Stuart M. Phillips, et. Al. - "Postexercise Dietary Protein Strategies to Maximize Skeletal Muscle Repair and Remodeling in Masters Endurance Athletes: A Review" and "What is the Optimal Amount of Protein to Support Post-Exercise Skeletal Muscle Reconditioning in the Older Adult?" International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, Volume 26 Issue 2, April 2016

(4) Phillips, S. M. (2014a). - "A brief review of higher dietary protein diets in weight loss: a focus on athletes" Sport. Med. 2014

(5) Murphy CH, Hector AJ, Stuart M Phillips, - "Considerations for protein intake in managing weight loss in athletes" Eur J Sport Sci. 2015;15(1):21-8. doi: 10.1080/17461391.2014.936325. Epub 2014 Jul 11.

(6) Phillips, Stuart M. - "A brief review of critical processes in exercise-induced muscular hypertrophy" Sports Med. 2014; 44(Suppl 1): 71–77. Published online 2014 May 3. doi: 10.1007/s40279-014-0152-3